Author Topic: Unofficial Antitrust Topic Ballot  (Read 6336 times)

jlemuel1

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Unofficial Antitrust Topic Ballot
« on: June 08, 2021, 10:46:06 PM »
Greetings,

It may be a bit before the official ballot is released on CEDA Forums but the following ballot has been unanimously approved by the topic committee. Feel free to circulate and discuss with your squads.

Joel
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Antitrust Topic Resolution Options

1. Expand Scope, Core

Resolved: The United States Federal Government should expand the scope of its core antitrust laws to substantially increase prohibitions on anticompetitive business practices by the private sector.

2. Expand Scope, Non-Core

Resolved: The United States Federal Government should expand the scope of its antitrust laws to substantially increase prohibitions on anticompetitive business practices by the private sector.

3. Increase Prohibitions, Expand Scope Floor

Resolved: The United States Federal Government should substantially increase prohibitions on anticompetitive business practices by the private sector by at least expanding the scope of its core antitrust laws.

4. Increase Prohibitions, Expand Interpretation Floor

Resolved: The United States Federal Government should substantially increase its antitrust law prohibitions on private sector conduct by at least statutorily and/or judicially expanding its interpretation of anticompetitive conduct.

5. Expand Scope, Create Standards List Floor

Resolved: The United States Federal Government should expand the scope of its antitrust law, by at least establishing one or more of the following limits on anticompetitive business practices by the private sector:
• a public interest standard;
• a strict standard for exclusionary conduct and acquisitions of potential and/or nascent competitors by digital platforms;
• a strict standard for horizontal mergers;
• a strict standard for vertical mergers.

6. Expand Scope, Replace Consumer Welfare Standard Floor

Resolved: The United States Federal Government should substantially expand the scope of its antitrust law by at least replacing the consumer welfare standard.